How Doritos Is Using Its New Community For Marketing #CSreport2015

Image via Linkedin.com (click to access article)

Image via Linkedin.com (click to access article)

After writing quite a bit about Doritos’ crowdsourcing activity of the last decade, which all started with the famous “Crash The Super Bowl” video contest, let’s have a look at the “next step” that PepsiCo’s brand seems to take. The company has indeed started a platform called Doritos Legion Of The Bold, which is  based on Flockstar, a crowdsourcing technology operated by Texas-based agency The Marketing Arm. Blogger Dan Lamoureux said about it: “It sounds like [Doritos] is so crazy for crowdsourced content that they’re going to start running lots of smaller contests all year long.  That’s an interesting bit of news in and of itself.

And indeed they are because, as I write this, Doritos has launched a dozen of marketing competitions already on this platform. It is mainly about marketing activation and consumer engagement, but tomorrow they might start running HQ-video projects or innovation contests. So, will they kill “Crash The Super Bowl” eventually? Is this a logical next step for the brand to drive consumer engagement? Here is what Doritos has used this platform for, and some thoughts about where this might lead to in the future. Long story short: I think it’s a very smart move, let’s see where it’s heading.

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Here’s What A French CMO Thinks About Creative Crowdsourcing

Click on the image to see the contest results on eYeka

Click on the image to see the contest results on eYeka

Earlier this year, Aviva launched a contest, asking the eYeka community to share their ideas about what “useful” means to them when it comes to insurance (disclaimer: I work at eYeka as a Marketing Manager). “Tell us what your needs are […] and help Aviva become the most useful insurance company ever!” the brief asked. Aviva received about 50 ideas from over 20 countries, which the company praised as being “interesting and rich entries,” and rewarded 3 ideas from Singapore, Mexico and Argentina. What did the person behind the project think about creative crowdsourcing? Here’s a translation of what Françoise Lamotte, Aviva France’s former CMO, shared about the crowdsourcing experience on her blog.

The original article, called “Le crowdsourcing à l’assaut de la forteresse des créatifs?” (“Is crowdsourcing taking the creative fortress by storm?“) was published here; this is a translation of it (emphases and links added by myself). You can find the contest results and the brand’s feedback to the community on the contest announcement page too. Continue reading →

Watch These 10 Awesome Brand Videos Taking Place In Paris

Image via Flickr

Image via Flickr

I love living in Paris, it is such a beautiful and vibrant city. In this post, I simply would like to share a couple of (crowdsourced) brand videos that star the city of light. My work at eYeka (Paris) allows me to see so many creative videos, both on eYeka and on other crowdsourcing platforms, that I just have to spread some of them, and why not take the place I live in as a common thread for all of them? Watch these videos submitted to various crowdsourcing competitions for brands like Microsoft, Lux, Lacoste, Puma and others… and come over visit this beautiful part of the world one day! Continue reading →

Twiinkly Wants To Crowdsource The Photo Coverage of (Sport) Events

Click on the image to see Twiinkly on the App Store

Click on the image to see Twiinkly on the App Store

I love running, and I somehow I am interested in crowdsourcing too (you didn’t notice?), so I’d like to feature an exciting start-up here. Twiinkly, founded by Christophe Delalande (SKEMA 2009) and Martin Gaffuri (ESSCA 2009), wants to leverage events’ audiences to enable better coverage by the spectators: “As an onsite spectator, become actor of the live coverage by taking photos and sharing them on Twiinkly,the App Store description says, “enter a runner’s name or their bib number to customise the race timeline and have a unique and personalised live coverage experience.” Here’s more about Twiinkly. Continue reading →

Oxylane Launches (Another) Sports-Related Open Innovation Platform

Today (February 12th) the Open Oxyale page is still in teaser mode. Click to access

Today (February 12th) the Open Oxyale page is still in teaser mode. Click to access

On April 1st, Oxylane Group will launch “Open Oxylane,” a sports-related open innovation platform. That’s what the French trade magazine LSA reported yesterday. Despite the launch date, it’s probably serious business. Oxylane Group, which runs the Decathlon department stores, has already made inroads into co-creation and open innovation: in October 2011 I blogged about b’Twin Lab, a co-creation platform dedicated to cycling products (which has closed since), and in April 2012 I blogged about a series of contests run by the same brand with Local Motors. These didn’t seem to have been a success, but with Open Oxylane, the company keeps pushing.
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The Three French Challengers of Quirky

Quirky’s mantra is to “make invention accessible” to all – and it seems to work if you judge by the success of Quirky in the United States. But as soon as you have success, you also start having competition, either globally or locally. A lot of entrepreneurs want to replicate that idea in their respective countries, adapt it, tweak it a bit.

In France, a country that pioneered the concept between 2007 and 2011 with the rise and fall of CrowdSpirit, where I also happen to live and work, collaborative innovation platforms are popping up like mushrooms. What are they called? Who are their founders? What is their model? What are they ambitions? Let’s have a look at Quirky France… and three of their challengers: Nov’in, La Fabrique à Innovations, and MyKompany. Continue reading →

A Tour of Quirky’s Headquarters in New York City [Photos]

Quirky Product Eval Behind The Scenes

In NYC for a week (holidays), I thought it would be a great opportunity to visit Quirky, this interesting company that “makes invention accessible.” I’ve already written about Quirky a number of times, both in English and in French, and I was excited to get visit their office on Thursday night, and to attend the product evaluation session, or “Quirky Eval.” The photos are by @maelroth and me – only mine are bad in quality. Continue reading →