This Guy Travelled Around The World To Meet Creative Community Members

Image via vimeo.com

Meet Matias Planas, a graphic designer and photographer from Argentina who also happens to be a member of the jovoto crowdsourcing platform. He just came back from a round-the-world trip where he met a lot of other creatives from the same community (I think this is awesome!). As Matias basically did in real life what I a have been doing for years for my PhD – which is to find out why creatives from across the world participate in crowdsourcing projects – I got in touch and asked him a couple of questions. Continue reading →

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Recruiting Individuals to a Crowdsourcing Community: Findings From an Ad Copy Test

Video Contest Website Landing PagesRecently, a counterpart contacted me to get some insights about how to attract and activate “solvers” on a platform. That person had validated a business need to create a crowdsourcing platform, but was now looking to assemble the community to respond to the challenges he would launch on its platform. How do you assemble a community? Some tips are already available in this book, but it’s a bit dated. Here are some findings from a project that we just published as a book chapter, along with Daren Brabham and Jean-François Lemoine. Continue reading →

How Doritos Is Using Its New Community For Marketing #CSreport2015

Image via Linkedin.com (click to access article)

Image via Linkedin.com (click to access article)

After writing quite a bit about Doritos’ crowdsourcing activity of the last decade, which all started with the famous “Crash The Super Bowl” video contest, let’s have a look at the “next step” that PepsiCo’s brand seems to take. The company has indeed started a platform called Doritos Legion Of The Bold, which is  based on Flockstar, a crowdsourcing technology operated by Texas-based agency The Marketing Arm. Blogger Dan Lamoureux said about it: “It sounds like [Doritos] is so crazy for crowdsourced content that they’re going to start running lots of smaller contests all year long.  That’s an interesting bit of news in and of itself.

And indeed they are because, as I write this, Doritos has launched a dozen of marketing competitions already on this platform. It is mainly about marketing activation and consumer engagement, but tomorrow they might start running HQ-video projects or innovation contests. So, will they kill “Crash The Super Bowl” eventually? Is this a logical next step for the brand to drive consumer engagement? Here is what Doritos has used this platform for, and some thoughts about where this might lead to in the future. Long story short: I think it’s a very smart move, let’s see where it’s heading.

Continue reading →

My Favorties Of December: Countries As Brands, Sorbonne From The Inside & Choices Across Cultures

Image via @HistoricalPics (click to see tweet)To wrap up 2014 nicely, here is a selection of links (articles, reports, interviews, photos…) that I liked and tweeted in December. Articles about crowdsourcing, content marketing, entrepreneurship and open creativity populate this wrap-up, I hope you will like them.

For me, 2015 will mark a pivot year as I will start as a full-time Marketing Manager at eYeka, shifting the focus away from research and towards driving business results for the world’s leading creative crowdsourcing platform. I just found this part of my job to keep me going more than only doing teaching and research (note that I will finish my thesis, continue working on currently ongoing research projects and start teaching marketing at ESSCA Business School, so I’m not totally changing focus).

Happy 2015 to you all! Continue reading →

Discussion With LEGO’s Community Strategist, Yun Mi Antorini

Yun Mi Antorini

LEGO, one of the most creative and loved brands in the world, attributes a big part of its success to its thriving fan community. Almost 10 million Facebook fans, over 180,000 Twitter followers or a 10,000+ member LEGO Ideas community show that the brand and its product have huge traction among kids and adults alike (watch this TED talk to have a short impression of the phenomenon). The company has not only recognized the power of this fanbase, realized how valuable it is, but they actively encourage its development and look for its well-being – from a passive observer to an active promoter.

I’ve already blogged about community management in a crowdsourcing setting, now here’s an interview of LEGO’s “Community Strategist,” Yun Mi Antorini, whose job is – basically- to make that community happy (how cool is that?). Continue reading →

The Three French Challengers of Quirky

Quirky’s mantra is to “make invention accessible” to all – and it seems to work if you judge by the success of Quirky in the United States. But as soon as you have success, you also start having competition, either globally or locally. A lot of entrepreneurs want to replicate that idea in their respective countries, adapt it, tweak it a bit.

In France, a country that pioneered the concept between 2007 and 2011 with the rise and fall of CrowdSpirit, where I also happen to live and work, collaborative innovation platforms are popping up like mushrooms. What are they called? Who are their founders? What is their model? What are they ambitions? Let’s have a look at Quirky France… and three of their challengers: Nov’in, La Fabrique à Innovations, and MyKompany. Continue reading →

Genius Crowds, Another Company That Failed to Turn Co-Creation Into a Profit

Genius Crowds is Out of Business

In May 2011, I covered the French platform Crowdspirit, and tried to discuss the reasons of its failure. In August of the same year, I wrote a blog post about the costs of co-creation, underlining that there are substantial costs to orchestrate crowdsourcing and/or organize co-creation, and that profitable platforms are actually rare. Well, very recently, crowdsourcing.org announced that a US-based crowdsourcing company, Genius Crowds, had to close its doors. Why? Because Genius Crowds was not able to turn their co-creative model into a profit.

“As a small startup, we frankly didn’t have enough resources to do the job of business development that we wanted to be able to do” (C.J. Kettler, CEO and co-founder) Continue reading →