Steep learning curve: My first years as a manager

NB Equipe WiSEED Toulouse_1_small

Photo by Pauline de Courrèges (via WiSEED)

4 years ago, HBR wrote that “most people don’t want to be managers” ; and more recently I’ve read a number of articles about Millennials not wanting to become managers neither. Despite these studies and trend reports, I always saw a management position as a logical next step in my career, and I am happy to lead the marketing function (team and agencies) at WiSEED.

My first 2-and-a-half years as a manager haven’t always been easy, and part of it can be linked to still being a young professional. Here are some learnings that I am happy to share about managing people, sometimes older than you (even though that mustn’t always be taken into consideration), when you haven’t hit the 30y. mark. Many mistakes, many successes and a very steep learning curve.

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In May/June: Direct-to-Consumer Models, Agility At Scale & Teaching Alexa French

Warby Parker DTC article INC

Image via Inc.com

May & June have been busy months, and therefore I am combining my favorite reads of both months in this single blog post. Again, most articles discuss business strategy in web-driven environments (Warby Parker, Zalando…) but also some stories about user experience, culture or investing in the media.  Continue reading →

In March: Print News, Silicon Valley’s Privacy & Christopher Wylie’s Story

wylie 2

Just five article that I found worthwhile sharing for March, and – of course – one is about Cambridge Analytica, co-founded by whistleblower Christopher Wylie. Also: a timely but unrelated piece about Silicon Valley’s culture of sercecy, an op-ed about reading news (only) in print and more.
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My Favorites of October: Trello’s Product, Calorie Counting & Can Data Dream?

calorie countingIn October, product strategy meets finance and marketing. One of the articles is about the perilous idea of prompting people to walk, especially when it comes to colored pastry comparisons. The last link is about Nike’s design process, more precisely an interview of the apparel brand’s chief design officer, who “doodles all day” while still managing to impart a creative direction to 1,000+ people across the organization. While I did read and enjoy all of this in the last month, I hand it over to you, and spend some time somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading →

My Favorites of August: Learning Culture, Assisted Shaving & Harbin Opera House

Harbin is a small city (10 million inhabitants…) in North-East China, just above North Korea. What is worthwhile about Harbin is neither its size nor its situation, but its brandnew Opera House. Below I share a video from an ArchDaily journalist visiting this incredible building, designed in China, for China. Also shared: an interview of Facebook’s HR head, an article about the network’s innovation benchmarks, a beautiful Gillette-ad & more.  Continue reading →

WiSEED a besoin de nouvelles compétences #marketing pour grandir ! #Paris #Toulouse

J’ai toujours été un défenseur de l’innovation ouverte et de la co-création. Chez WiSEED, acteur référent et leader de l’investissement en France, nous avons aussi pour habitude d’impliquer nos clients et partenaires dans la création de valeur. Historiquement, tout d’abord, ou plus récemment, que ça soit pour des fonctionnalités nouvelles, par la création d’un club de clients particulièrement engagés ou pour l’amélioration de services existants. Cette “main tendue” est extrêmement bénéfique, sachant qu’il faut toujours donner en retour. Continue reading →

My Favorites in October: LVMH and Cycling, Derek Black’s Story & Donald Trump’s Revolutionaries

Image via Bettmann Archive

Derek Black’s father, 1982 (via Bettmann Archive)

This month again, a bunch of great articles about marketing, management, sports sponsoring or financial innovation. The usual suspects. But, in the wake of the U.S. election, also two long, important articles about U.S. nationalism in the broad sense. The first is a lengthy article about Derek Black, who turned his back to white nationalism as he met co-students from other cultures and beliefs. The second is about the follower crowd of Donald Trump, depicted as a heterogeneous – and sometimes sympathetic – group of people opposing a variety of contemporary realities (from immigration to media) with little alternatives to offer. May these two be as interesting to you as they were to me.
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