Back to #MarTech: I’m happy to join Ogury

ogury bicycle illustration

Image via @weareOgury

Self-awareness is key to happiness. I think a lot – maybe too much – about work, life, health, attitude and balance. But if there is one thing that I have the luck to be satisfied with, it’s my job! I love working in marketing & communications and am incredibly thankful to go to work happy every single day.

But to sustain this positive state-of-mind and to remain challenged, you sometimes need to move out of your comfort zones, think 2 or 3 steps ahead and not self-satisfy with what you have (am I overthinking again?). This is what I had in mind when having the opportunity to join Ogury, a globally operating tech firm that is creating a whole new category in marketing.

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In June: Eating less meat, the Creepiness–Convenience Tradeoff & “…it’s always been cats.”

shopping illustration

Image via The New York Times

It has been boiling hot here in France this week, with temperatures above 40°C in many places across the country. It’s difficult to argue that these extreme temperatures are unrelated to climate change, which in turn is caused by much of our human activity… including what we eat.

In my favorites reads of the month, you’ll find a great, interactive, well-illustrated, data-rich NYT article about food and climate change… as well as a number of usual suspects about marketing, technology and the likes. Enjoy the read, and stay tuned in the next days.

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In August: SoftBank’s Vision Fund, Target’s Vision Connect App & Investors’ Crypto Awakening

target app

Milkos/iStock via FastCompany.com

Here are some very interesting summer reads I would like to spread the word about. A cool portrait of a Japanese star-investor, a fabulous co-creative tool used by the American supermarket chain Target, a rather sad article about deceived crypto investors and more. I still enjoy reading about tech, growth and the challenges brought along by success and growth. It’s so easy to look at companies and their policies in hindsight and/or from the outside, criticizing their choices and policies. But one ought to remember that people build companies, and that people are limited, biased, imperfect trying to make the most of themselves and the organizations they work for. Continue reading →