Joachim Gaucks “Toleranz” ist eine wichtige Erinnerung an das, was Menschen verbindet

Ich habe das Buch des vorherigen Bundespräsidenten (geschrieben mit der Journalistin Helga Hirsch) vor knapp einem Jahr in Düsseldorf gekauft, und es lange liegen gelassen.

Erstens, weil ich Abends und während meiner Wochenenden nicht immer Lust hatte, ein Buch aufzuschlagen, dass so ein “schweres” Thema angeht. Zweitens, weil mir damals die ersten Seiten den Eindruck gegeben haben, dass das Buch viel hitorischer und philophischer war, als ich es erwartet hätte (was in den späteren Kapiteln nicht mehr der Fall ist).

In den diesjährigen Sommerferien habe ich mich endlich dazu entschlossen, es zu Ende zu lesen… und ich habe es sehr genossen. Hier teile ich einige meiner Lieblingspassagen. Continue reading →

Benjamin Franklin’s List of 13 Virtues

I have just finished Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography (full text here), a short and entertaining read written in 18th century English. Once you get used to the prose, it becomes very enjoyable to read. I learned a lot about the founding father, his life and travels (including that he started writing the autobiography just across the Seine, in 1784), his views, skills, inventions and various projects as a public servant.

Continue reading →

In February: A couple of books, a cool event format & Ubernomics

ubernomics-uber-app-illustration

Image via Qz.com

This month, I am only sharing a single online article, one about academic research at Uber, and it dates back to October 2018 (it somehow showed up in my Twitter timeline last week). But besides, this month I just write about two books I have finished in February, one about economic warfare and another about information management, as well as a business speed-dating event format I have discovered: les BigBoss. Continue reading →

I loved “Five Dysfunctions of a Team” – What else would you recommend?

dysfunctions

Image via TableGroup.com

I’ve recently written about my first years as a manager, the satisfactions and difficulties, the doubts and achievements that come with it. I’m pretty open about it for 2 reasons. First: I’ve always liked sharing and writing, so why shun this subject? Second, I believe I can learn from those who read – and will react to – it both online and offline.

So let me write about this book I just finished, that I found absolutely brilliant. Those who have MBAs and/or are versed to management literature probably know it already; those who don’t (like me) should. And here’s why. Continue reading →

My favorites of December: Armstrong’s investment, Google friendship & Future of books

Here google friendship new yorkerare my 6 favorite articles of December 2018, the last of a great year 2018 (despite the problems in the world and the worries we all have, I like to look at it positively). You’ll find a couple of articles about branding and the Parisian startup scene, but also 2 longer pieces about “the Google friendship”  and the future of books. Continue reading →

Crazitivity: A review of Butzi’s great book about creative self-confidence

Butzi is a friend, a magician, a keynote speaker and (now) an author. I’ve just finished his first book, in which he introduces a concept he’s quite passionate about: “crazitivity.” Take it as a mantra, a way of looking at life; not as a theoretical concept or method (even though Butzi says it’s a brainstorming technique) to come up with better ideas.

Butzi – real name Johannes Alinhac – uses the 150 pages of his book to make a point about the importance of creative self-confidence and the value of following one’s instincts. What makes the book powerful and interesting is that he is a living proof of what he writes. He shares many anecdotes about ideating for his magic tricks and freaking out when he first presented them to his audiences, from his parents to major corporate clients… This is what I found most impactful to bring his message across. Continue reading →

My favorite holiday reads from Cambodia

Koh Rong Samloen ReadingI originally started this blog to share thoughts, reads and conferences that I found worthwhile writting about. It turns out that my last book review dates almost 2 years back, so it’s time to write about books again! Just came back from 2 weeks of really relaxing holidays in Cambodia, a beautifull country that has much more to offer than the magnificient temples of Angkor.

I have spent quite some time reading – as I do under that palm tree on the picture – and I ended up wanting to write a blog post about 4 of the books I have enjoyed most during our holidays, 2 of which are about Cambodia’s tumultuous history. Continue reading →