I loved “Five Dysfunctions of a Team” – What else would you recommend?

dysfunctions

Image via TableGroup.com

I’ve recently written about my first years as a manager, the satisfactions and difficulties, the doubts and achievements that come with it. I’m pretty open about it for 2 reasons. First: I’ve always liked sharing and writing, so why shun this subject? Second, I believe I can learn from those who read – and will react to – it both online and offline.

So let me write about this book I just finished, that I found absolutely brilliant. Those who have MBAs and/or are versed to management literature probably know it already; those who don’t (like me) should. And here’s why. Continue reading →

Advertisements

My favorites of December: Armstrong’s investment, Google friendship & Future of books

Here google friendship new yorkerare my 6 favorite articles of December 2018, the last of a great year 2018 (despite the problems in the world and the worries we all have, I like to look at it positively). You’ll find a couple of articles about branding and the Parisian startup scene, but also 2 longer pieces about “the Google friendship”  and the future of books. Continue reading →

Crazitivity: A review of Butzi’s great book about creative self-confidence

Butzi is a friend, a magician, a keynote speaker and (now) an author. I’ve just finished his first book, in which he introduces a concept he’s quite passionate about: “crazitivity.” Take it as a mantra, a way of looking at life; not as a theoretical concept or method (even though Butzi says it’s a brainstorming technique) to come up with better ideas.

Butzi – real name Johannes Alinhac – uses the 150 pages of his book to make a point about the importance of creative self-confidence and the value of following one’s instincts. What makes the book powerful and interesting is that he is a living proof of what he writes. He shares many anecdotes about ideating for his magic tricks and freaking out when he first presented them to his audiences, from his parents to major corporate clients… This is what I found most impactful to bring his message across. Continue reading →

My favorite holiday reads from Cambodia

Koh Rong Samloen ReadingI originally started this blog to share thoughts, reads and conferences that I found worthwhile writting about. It turns out that my last book review dates almost 2 years back, so it’s time to write about books again! Just came back from 2 weeks of really relaxing holidays in Cambodia, a beautifull country that has much more to offer than the magnificient temples of Angkor.

I have spent quite some time reading – as I do under that palm tree on the picture – and I ended up wanting to write a blog post about 4 of the books I have enjoyed most during our holidays, 2 of which are about Cambodia’s tumultuous history. Continue reading →

In December: @Mr_Turley about Formula 1, @ItsMattWard about Uber & @DorieClark’s Book

F1-logo-mock-up-2017

Image via CreativeReview.co.uk

There have been more than 30 monthly digest posts now. A small milestone that I’m quite proud of, as it takes discipline to write up a blog post every month. But it’s a good way to give all the things we see & read every day a second thought. Sitting down and synthesizing thought-provoking content in a series of paragraphs allows me to improve my writing & communication skills. And to build a community!

Continue reading →

This Poor Breton Peasant’s Autobiography, an International Best-Seller

20161120_151206

The life story of an ordinary, brilliant, anarchist peasant from Brittany

Exactly 112 years ago, on January 6th 1905, a Breton peasant neamed Jean-Marie Déguignet wrote the last words of the story of his life, and died shortly after. He ended over 4,000 pages with these words : “I wish humanity  the power – even the willpower – to become truthfull and good people, able to understand and get along with each other, in a worthy and happy social life.” His own life has been neither happy nor worthy, which is why this best-selling autobiography is such a fascinating account of rural life between 1834 and 1905. I’ll try to make this review worth reading. Continue reading →

I Read This Book About The Importance of Wasting Time on the Internet

wasting-time-on-the-internet-book

Are we becoming lazier and dumbing ourselves down with silly content on the internet? Should we be scared that most of us look like sleepwalking zombies when walking while staring at our smartphones? Many believe it, and countless articles are written around that narrative. Not much room for optimism. Kenneth Goldsmith, a poet and artist from New York City, believes that more good than bad stems from our increased connectedness – and he wrote a book about it: “Wasting Time On The Internet.” Continue reading →