I loved “Five Dysfunctions of a Team” – What else would you recommend?

dysfunctions

Image via TableGroup.com

I’ve recently written about my first years as a manager, the satisfactions and difficulties, the doubts and achievements that come with it. I’m pretty open about it for 2 reasons. First: I’ve always liked sharing and writing, so why shun this subject? Second, I believe I can learn from those who read – and will react to – it both online and offline.

So let me write about this book I just finished, that I found absolutely brilliant. Those who have MBAs and/or are versed to management literature probably know it already; those who don’t (like me) should. And here’s why. Continue reading →

Crazitivity: A review of Butzi’s great book about creative self-confidence

Butzi is a friend, a magician, a keynote speaker and (now) an author. I’ve just finished his first book, in which he introduces a concept he’s quite passionate about: “crazitivity.” Take it as a mantra, a way of looking at life; not as a theoretical concept or method (even though Butzi says it’s a brainstorming technique) to come up with better ideas.

Butzi – real name Johannes Alinhac – uses the 150 pages of his book to make a point about the importance of creative self-confidence and the value of following one’s instincts. What makes the book powerful and interesting is that he is a living proof of what he writes. He shares many anecdotes about ideating for his magic tricks and freaking out when he first presented them to his audiences, from his parents to major corporate clients… This is what I found most impactful to bring his message across. Continue reading →

My favorite holiday reads from Cambodia

Koh Rong Samloen ReadingI originally started this blog to share thoughts, reads and conferences that I found worthwhile writting about. It turns out that my last book review dates almost 2 years back, so it’s time to write about books again! Just came back from 2 weeks of really relaxing holidays in Cambodia, a beautifull country that has much more to offer than the magnificient temples of Angkor.

I have spent quite some time reading – as I do under that palm tree on the picture – and I ended up wanting to write a blog post about 4 of the books I have enjoyed most during our holidays, 2 of which are about Cambodia’s tumultuous history. Continue reading →

This Poor Breton Peasant’s Autobiography, an International Best-Seller

20161120_151206

The life story of an ordinary, brilliant, anarchist peasant from Brittany

Exactly 112 years ago, on January 6th 1905, a Breton peasant neamed Jean-Marie Déguignet wrote the last words of the story of his life, and died shortly after. He ended over 4,000 pages with these words : “I wish humanity  the power – even the willpower – to become truthfull and good people, able to understand and get along with each other, in a worthy and happy social life.” His own life has been neither happy nor worthy, which is why this best-selling autobiography is such a fascinating account of rural life between 1834 and 1905. I’ll try to make this review worth reading. Continue reading →

I Read This Book About The Importance of Wasting Time on the Internet

wasting-time-on-the-internet-book

Are we becoming lazier and dumbing ourselves down with silly content on the internet? Should we be scared that most of us look like sleepwalking zombies when walking while staring at our smartphones? Many believe it, and countless articles are written around that narrative. Not much room for optimism. Kenneth Goldsmith, a poet and artist from New York City, believes that more good than bad stems from our increased connectedness – and he wrote a book about it: “Wasting Time On The Internet.” Continue reading →

A Perfect Map Of The World Will Never Exist

I started reading the book on my way back from Singapore. A live map showed us where we were in real time

I started reading the book on my way back from Singapore. A map showed us where we were in real time (which is not anecdotal, as I found out after finishing its last chapter about today’s usage of maps)

I love maps, I could stand hours in front one, whether it represents my city or the entire world; whether it hangs on a wall or it twist at my fingertips on my tablet. It is quite a creative and cheap way to travel! I just finished a fascinating book: A History of the World in 12 Maps, written by a British professor, Jerry Brotton. He explains how humans have always been driven to represent the world around them, and how each of these representations is shaped by cultural, political or commercial interests. Google Earth is no exception.

Continue reading →

My Book Review of @AneeshChopra’s “Innovative State”

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Aneesh Chopra was the first Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of the Unites States government, and served in this position from 2009 to early 2012. Since then, he has run for the office of Governor in Virginia (but has not succeeded) and created Hunch Analytics, a company which crunches public and private data to “help executives and industry leaders in health care, education and energy to make smarter business decisions.” But this post is not about the latter, it’s about Chopra’s experience as the USA’s very first CTO, and his vision of how technology can improve governments.

I enjoyed reading Innovative State very much, not only because it mirrors some of the phenomena I study in academia, but also because it reminded me of Gilles Babinet‘s book about his experience as a digital champion in France (disclaimer: Gilles Babinet is co-founder and board member of eYeka, where I work part-time). While Babinet had a much more consultative role, Chopra was leading the action in the White House – which also shows how seriously digital technologies are taken in France (not a lot!) compared to the US. Anyway. His views on how new technologies can transform government, shared in Innovative State, are highly interesting. According to him, four priorities (open data, impatient convening, challenges & prizes and attracting talent) should drive the US’s agenda toward becoming “a 21st century government that elevates the role of everyday Americans.Continue reading →