Design Needs To Adapt To Digital Disruption Too (@Damien_Creatif’s Master Thesis)

Damien Henry presenting his work at the "Prix du Mémoire Digital" in Paris, France

Damien Henry presenting his work at the “Prix du Mémoire Digital” in Paris, France

My activity leads me to speak to a lot of Masters or PhD students who explore the crowd economy. Actually, at eYeka we receive so many interview requests that I am now sending standard replies with links to the most common answers (Why do brands crowdsource? Why do consumers participate? etc, for which a lot is available online and in academic literature). But some research projects stand out as really original and interesting. After sharing a good Masters thesis of a student of mine who worked on women’s pro sports, this post is a Q&A with a French designer, Damien Henry, who completed his thesis (not under my supervision).

Entitled “Crowdsourcing: Can Graphic Design Become Uberized?“, his already award-winning thesis is a rare piece of research that explores the pros & cons of crowdsourcing from a designers’ point of view. While I do not endorse all his findings or POVs, I believe it his work is worth being shared beyond the French-speaking world. So I’m translating a slightly edited English transcript of our conversation (images and links have been added by myself). Continue reading →

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My Favorites in November: Advertising in 60 Seconds, Problematic Crowd Work & The Parisian Lifestyle

History of Advertising Timeline

This was a special month here in Paris, especially the second half, with the terrorist attacks and the start of the COP21 climate conference shrouding the city in a very particular atmosphere. Much more security, armed forces on almost every street corner, helicopters, heads of state… it’s not the usual Parisian life. But nevertheless, the earth keeps spinning, people will not stop going into bars and cafés, and I won’t stop sharing my favorite inspirations neither. Here are some tweets about entrepreneurship, marketing, creativity, crowd labor and Paris (of course). Make sure to look at the short video about Google’s “Alive Memory” project in Russia. Continue reading →

“Open your Mouth. Show Attitude.” @AnjaReschke1’s Comment Against Hate Speech (in English)

In a time where Europe sees increasing news coverage about migrants both inside (ex: Paris, Calais) and outside its borders (ex: Syria, Lybia), there is a worrying uptake of public hate speech on the internet and attacks on refugee shelters. Yesterday evening, in the German television news program Tagesschau, broadcast on the German public-service television network ARD, Anja Reschke made a 2-minute, important statement on German public TV: “Open Your Month, Show Attitude.” While anyone can have an opinion on the way – and the extent to which – countries should receive and help migrants, there a universal, important message in what she said. Here it is in English (links and bold passages added by myself). Continue reading →

My Favorites in July: Heineken’s Creative Ladder, Airbnb in Cuba & Pretending to be a Successful Startup

Image via Short Film Corner Cannes

Image via Short Film Corner Cannes

Stay thirsty for creativity, “Creative Marketer of the Year” Heineken said at Cannes Lions this year, where Senior Global Brand Director Gianluca Di Tonda said the brand was “in the business of connecting emotions” while Global Marketing Executive Director Soren Hagh added that great creative work is often made by “people who take risks.” In this post, I share some links about the good & the ugly of creativity, about eYeka’s community members, about scaling a business in a country where there is little or no internet access. You’ll also find two links about failing crowd-based businesses – Quirky and Homejoy – and about pretending to be big when you’re not. Continue reading →

My Favorites In May: Airbnb’s Impact on Hotels, Facebook’s Branding & Italian Architects Fight Crowdsourcing

Image via "Office of Ben Barry"

Image via “Office of Ben Barry”

Here are 10 tweets from the month of May, which I found worthwhile sharing again. Two of them are about architects and their attitude towards competition(s), one is about corporate branding and design (see the image on the left), others just share some nice advertising. I also enjoyed reading this AdAge article about Google’s battle against click fraud, which costs online advertisers its customers $6.3 billion a year, according to a study by White Ops and the ANA. It nicely reminds us that every internet service has a cost – in this case it’s combatting abuse – which impacts both the bottom line of the company and that of its users. Gaining trust in online environments is crucial, which is why Google went “public” with this article, a nice PR effort to position itself as an industry leader.

Continue reading →

The Stock Photo Model That Wanted To Remain Anonymous

A caption of the "Ariane - The Overexposed Stock Image Model" facebook page (click to see more)

A caption of the “Ariane – The Overexposed Stock Image Model” facebook page (click to see more)

In December 2014, I took part in a debate about crowdsourcing in which one of the attendees, a professional photographer, said that stock photography lowers advertising quality. He wasn’t totally opposed to the concept of crowdsourced stock photography, but said that it leads to lower quality as the diversity of visuals is poor. While I haven’t studies the topic it depth, he has a point, and here’s an example: Ariane.

You MUST have seen her in the last years! “Ariane is so ubiquitous, she has probably entered your subconscious at some point,Placeit notes; even at eYeka we’ve been guilty of it (see here or here). Here’s an example of “technically the most famous model in the world” which is used in hundreds of ads across the world. Continue reading →

Quirky Acquires Consulting Firm To Start Servicing FMCG Companies

Click to see the photos my brother Maël and I took when we visited the Quirky HQ in New York, last year.

Click to see the photos that my brother and I took when we visited Quirky’s HQ last year.

Quirky, a company I blogged about quite regularly, has just announced the acquisition of the consulting firm Undercurrentin pivot to serve corporate clientsas Inc. notes. It is an interesting move, as it represents a shift from being (only) a product maker & distributor to (also) being a crowdsourcing agency that works for big clients. “Having joined forces with Undercurrent, Quirky can now give large companies access to its community of inventors and will give those companies exclusivity to certain product ideas,” Graham Winfrey’s Inc. article explains. So they’ll do pretty much the same than eYeka. Continue reading →